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Realize the Dream: Success in Business Requires Teachability 

(News USA) - Success in business and in life requires an open mind. In order to prosper, you have to be willing to learn -- and that means becoming a student.

"Formal education will make you a living, self-education will make you a fortune," says Johnna Parr, author of "When the Dream is Big Enough."

An entrepreneur who runs a successful network marketing business with her husband, Matt, Parr never thought of herself as a good learner. But when she was trying to start her business, she realized that she needed to absorb lessons from those who were already successful.

"I listened and took in all of the knowledge of the leaders of the business," says Parr. "I took the notes, reviewed them and implemented what I had learned."

Today, Parr is more teacher than student -- she helps other entrepreneurs realize their ambitions. One of the first things she tells budding entrepreneurs? They have to make themselves teachable.

Parr says that all business people experience different stages of learning:

Stage 1: "I know nothing." When people begin a new career, they tend to be enthusiastic learners -- they listen to educational audios and conference calls, read books and follow formulas set by industry leaders. Their businesses begin to grow. But no one stays in this stage forever.

Stage 2: "I know everything." Sooner or later, everyone hits this stage -- often destroying their business in the process. "Some people mistakenly believe that if they accomplish a goal, or have some success, they no longer have to learn or grow," says Parr. But this stagnant mindset leads to stagnant business -- know-it-alls either fail or stop being know-it-alls.

Stage 3: "I don't know everything." Entrepreneurs in this third stage know that they can bring good ideas to the table, but they also realize the importance of others' contributions. They form creative partnerships and never stop trying to grow and improve as leaders. Because they are good students, they also become good teachers. Their belief in themselves and their goal allows them to agree to disagree on important issues.

Few people naturally possess the skills to succeed in business. Success is a journey that requires teachability and a desire to learn. Without these qualities, realizing the dream may be impossible.

For more information, travel to www.johnnaparr.com.